The Accidental Low-Carb Apple Pie Omelette

On reflection, I have to admit this. I created an omelette that tastes much more like apple pie than pumpkin pie. 🙂  This happy accident occurred when I omitted the sugar-free vanilla from the pumpkin pie omelette recipe, substituted fresh apples for canned–and added the spice called “mace.”  A very nice apple pie flavor emerged — for only 10 net carbs.

Trying to lower the carbs

I started with the Pumpkin Pie Omelette, version 1.
I was working on version 2,  trying to pare down the carb count with a goal of great flavor and half the carbs.  Fresh apples, I knew from my past experiences in creating sweet omelettes (and pancakes), are really tasty additions. You can brown them in butter, sprinkle with cinnamon and stevia and they’re gorgeous.  You don’t have to use a whole apple, either, — only a quarter of a medium sized apple will do. A fine dice should yield about 1/3rd of a cup–about 5 carbs for your average apple (Granny Smith or Golden Delicious). 

My key mistake

I simply forgot to put in the Torani sugar-free vanilla in the pumpkin pie/egg yolk mix.  Without that key ingredient, the apple pie flavor jumps out at you –especially when you use the fresh, tart Granny Smith apple I used in this recipe.  The pumpkin flavor recedes into an almost savory background flavor. But it’s really good as an apple pie omelette. It’s just not a PUMPKIN pie omelette. 🙂  Live and learn.

The real difference, however, may have been the use the spice, “mace.”

About Mace – No, the SPICE, NOT the WEAPON!

Mace is the outer coating of the nutmeg fruit.  The nutmeg seed, inside the fruit, is the “nut” that we called the nutmeg “nut.”   The nutmeg fruit is kind of gloppy — nothing you’d eat fresh, but we’re told that it is used in Southeast Asian chutneys and dishes. Not something we get in the West, though. 

When you can find mace, it’s usually ground (and expensive: I paid 11 dollars for a 1.5 oz bottle of organic McCormick’s brand bottle!)  The true foodies, of course, buy it in its unground, unprocessed dried form. Then you can grind it yourself with a spice grinder. You can get the unground form  (called “blades” of mace) from the Spice House for $8.49 at this writing for a 1.5 ounce bottle (which when ground up NOT mean a real cost savings.  But sometimes we like to feel so very foodie.)

If I manage to use up all the mace in this bottle, I’ll consider the purchase and figure out if it’s worth the price. 

Photo by Jon Connell on Flickr

The ground mace from McCormick’s is very fresh seeming, slightly clumpy and moist. It’s more “floral” and “lighter” than the seed, but with a similar flavor.  I’d heard that it was “the secret” to the best apple pies from a pint-sized champion baker on a kid’s cooking show. Hmmmm.  That kid knew something about his apple pies.

Oh my, the Apples!

  • 1 medium-sized Granny Smith apple  (you’ll use 1/4th of it) —
  • 1/2 tsp Truvia baking blend (brown sugar and stevia blend)
  • dash of cinnamon, dash of nutmeg
  • 1/4 to 1/2 tsp of ground mace
  • 1/2 tsp or so of Meyer lemon juice or regular lemon juice and a sprinkle of sweetener of your choice.
  • Butter (for frying the apples)

Granny Smiths are known as the “tart, baking apple.”   The Granny Smith produced a very sweet, truly apple-pie flavor which just about overwhelmed the pumpkin. I cut the apple in two, peeled half, then cut the peeled half into two–and used a quarter of the apple. I diced the quarter apple quite small (about a quarter inch square) and measured it in a measuring cup so you, dear readers, will know how much I used. 

Directions for Preparing the Apple

  1. Cut the apple in two. 
  2. Peel half. 
  3. Cut the peeled half into two (giving you a quarter of the apple.)
  4. Dice one of the peeled, apple quarters, a smallish dice, about a quarter inch square or so
  5. Give a squeeze of lemon juice on top of the diced apples. No more than half a teaspoonful is needed.
    • Cook’s Note:I used a Meyer lemon. These can be hard to find–I found these at Trader Joe’s.
    • If you’re using an ordinary lemon,  I would add a light sprinkler of stevia or sucralose to the recipe, or add a little more of the Truvia blend
  6. In a small frying pan, melt a pat of butter.
  7. When it’s melted and sizzling, add the apples to the pain and begin to brown them.
  8. Sprinkle with cinnamon and nutmug over the apples as they fry in the butter.
  9. Add the 1/2 tsp of mace
  10. Sprinkle with Truvia baking mix.
  11. Brown the apples, remove the pan from the heat. I put them in a small container to help them cool for later.
  12. I save the rest of the apple in a baggie for later in the week!

The Rest of the Recipe

The rest of the recipe is the same as Pumpkin Omelette #1 except that we omit the canned apples and the craisins.   To recap, you’ll need

  • 3 tablespoons of pumpkin puree
  • 1 teaspoon ginger paste from a tube
  • Cinnamon, nutmeg, to taste
  • 3 eggs, separated
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar (optional)
  • sugar-free vanilla Torani syrup (optional) or 1/2 tsp of vanilla extra and 1/2 tsp of sweetener (also optional, see the cook’s note below.)
  • You’ll also need the cooked, diced apple that you prepared previously and set aside (see above).

The Directions for the Omelette

  1. Blend the pumpkin, ginger, cinnamon and nutmeg in a bowl, seasoning to taste. 
    • Cook’s Note: For a more “pumpkin-forward” flavor, add a teaspoon of Torani sugar-free vanilla syrup. Or substitute a 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract and a teaspoon of stevia or other sweetener.
  2. Add the egg yolks to the pumpkin mixture.
  3. Put the (oven safe!) omelette pan on the stove and provide a medium level of heat. Add butter and olive oil to the pan. Let the butter melt and stir occasionally to blend the butter and oil.
  4. Turn on the broiler to 550 degrees F. Let it begin to heat while you mix the egg whites
  5. Now for whisking up the egg WHITES. Add a half teaspoon cream of tartar to the egg WHITES.
  6. Whisp the egg whites until they double in volume, about 3 minutes.
  7. GENTLY fold the whites into the pumpkin mixture. Give it one or two gentle stirs with a spoon, no more. The egg whites should continue to be a foam on the top with just a few hints of stirred in orange streaks.
  8. Pour the pumpkin mix with the egg whites into the waiting, hot buttery pan.
  9. Gently add the cooked apple fragments evenly all over the omelette as it cooks in the pan. I use a fork to lower them into the omelette, one piece at a time
  10. Cook the omelette on the stove top still it mostly sets and the edges are beginning to look dry.
  11. Put the pan with the omelette in it under the broiler. Let it broil for no more than two minutes. It should puff up slightly if the low carb gods are in a smiling mood.
  12. Take the pan out of the broiler and gently slide the omelette onto a waiting plate.
  13. Give the omelette a light sprinkle of salt.

The Results

If you get the apples spread evenly all over the omelette, you’ll get a taste of apple pie in every bite.  An extra sprinkle of cinnamon and sweetener like Swerve would make this even sweeter — but I liked the slightly more savory flavor.

I can imagine other add-ins to this such as fennel or caramelized onions, to make a savory apple omelette.   

I can also imagine using sugar-free salted caramel syrup in this, to make it even sweeter. I could imagine serving it piled high with whipped cream as a dessert, even. 

In my next try at this, I’m thinking of adding a few fresh cranberries to the apple mixture–I’ll probably cook them separately with extra sweetener and a squeeze of fresh orange juice, then fold the cooked apples into them–and then make small dollops of apples and cranberries, hmmmm.  That would add four more carbs.  I’ll let you know how that turns out.  Sounds like a promising Turkey Day breakfast! 

Author: Lola

Recovering academic, real-life, honest to cornflakes anthropologist (Ph.D. and fieldwork and everything), tech-head and social media researcher.

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